Propagate Pothos

How to Propagate Pothos Plants – 6 Detail Guides

Pothos are beautiful climbing plants that are very popular and easy to care for. They thrive in low-light environments and can withstand neglect, making them ideal for both expert and inexperienced gardeners.

Pothos are not only fun to grow and easy to care for, but they are also easy to make more of. Really, it’s so easy that you won’t want to stop once you start.

Propagating your plant is an excellent way to get free pothos plants or to supplement your current plant.

There are many ways to grow these tropical plants, but the most common are water, soil, and sphagnum moss. We’ll talk about all three ways so you can pick the one that works best for you.

The best time to start new pothos plants is in the spring or summer, when the plant is growing quickly.

Don’t try to grow more of these plants in the fall or winter, when it’s less likely to work. Taking stem cuttings during these months will also make it harder for the mother plant to recover.

Propagate Pothos

What You’ll Need

Equipment / Tools

Propagating in Water

  • Pruning shears or scissors
  • Glass or plastic container/vase

Propagating in Soil

  • Pruning shears or scissors

Propagating in Sphagnum Moss

  • Pruning shears or scissors
  • Glass or plastic container/vase
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Materials

Propagating in Water

  • Water
  • Well-draining soil
  • Pot

Propagating in Soil

  • Rooting hormone
  • Well-draining soil
  • Pot

Propagating in Sphagnum Moss

  • Sphagnum moss
  • Well-draining soil
  • Pot

Propagate Pothos

How to Propagate Pothos in Water

The most common and popular way to grow pothos is in water, and it’s very easy to do. It’s also fun to do!

Cuttings may grow roots right before your eyes, and it’s easy to move these plants from water to soil. You will only need your clippings, a container, and some water.

Take Stem Cuttings

Use sharp, clean pruning shears or scissors to cut stems from the mother plant. There should be three to four nodes on each cutting.

The leaves and aerial roots are attached to the stem at small bumps called nodes. They are also where the new roots will grow from the cuttings.

Remove the Bottom Leaves

Once you have your stem cuttings, you will need to take off the leaves at the bottom because the cuttings will be in water.

You can either cut the leaves off with scissors or carefully pull them off the stem. Leave between one and two leaves at the top of each cut.

Place the Cuttings in Water

Fill a small container halfway with fresh water and put the stem cuttings in it, making sure the leaves are above the water and the nodes on the stem are under the water.

Whatever you have on hand can be used: clear or coloured glass jars, plastic containers, or small vases.

Change the Water Once a Week

To keep the cuttings fresh as they grow, change the water once a week. In a few weeks, roots should start to grow from the stem’s nodes.

Plant the Rooted Cuttings in Soil

Once the roots of the cuttings are at least 2 to 3 inches long, they can be moved from water to soil. Plant the cuttings in a small container with holes for drainage and soil that drains well.

Water the newly potted plant well before relocating it to a spot with bright, indirect light. Keep the soil evenly wet for the first one to two weeks to let the roots get used to the soil.

How to Propagate Pothos in Soil

You may even grow pothos directly in soil if you wish to avoid the water stage entirely. This method is also very reliable, but it is used less often.

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For this process, it’s best to use rooting hormone. You’ll also need a container and a soil mix that drains well.

Take Stem Cuttings

Use sharp, clean pruning shears or scissors to cut stems from the mother plant. There should be three to four nodes on each cutting.

The leaves and aerial roots are attached to the stem at small bumps called nodes. They are also where the new roots will grow from the cuttings.

Remove the Bottom Leaves

Take off the bottom leaves from each cutting and leave one or two on top. You can either cut the leaves off with scissors or carefully pull them off the stem.

Dip the Cutting in Rooting Hormone

Put the end of each stem cutting that has been cut into a powder rooting hormone.

Plant the Cuttings in Soil

Using your finger, make a tiny hole in the earth. Insert the rooting hormone-treated slice into the hole. Make sure the pot you buy has holes in the bottom for water to drain out and isn’t too big.

Fill the container with a well-draining potting mix and press the stem cuttings down into the soil so that the nodes along the stem are hidden but the top leaves remain visible. Pat the soil down firmly but gently around the cuttings to keep them in place.

Keep the Soil Moist

Place the potted cuttings in a position with bright, indirect light and water them well.

Propagate Pothos

It is important to keep the soil evenly wet while the cuttings are putting down roots (but not saturated).

After a few weeks, you might want to let the soil dry out a little between waterings.

How to Propagate Pothos in Sphagnum Moss

Lastly, it is easy to grow new pothos plants in sphagnum moss. Some growers know that sphagnum moss works well as a base for other plants and even prefer it.

If the other ideas haven’t worked, this one might be worth a shot. Most people, though, prefer to use water or soil instead, especially if they don’t have any sphagnum moss on hand.

Soak the Sphagnum Moss

Sphagnum moss is often sold dry, so it needs to be soaked for 20 to 30 minutes before it can be used to grow new plants.

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Half-fill a dish with water and put all of the moss in it. Put it aside while you work on the other steps.

Take Stem Cuttings

Use sharp, clean pruning shears or scissors to cut stems from the mother plant. There should be three to four nodes on each cutting.

The leaves and aerial roots are attached to the stem at small bumps called nodes. They are also where the new roots will grow from the cuttings.

Remove the Bottom Leaves

Take off the bottom leaves from each cutting and leave one or two on top. You can either cut the leaves off with scissors or carefully pull them off the stem.

Place the Cuttings in the Moss

When the moss has soaked long enough, take it out of the water and squeeze it as hard as you can. When you’re done, the moss should be damp but not soaked. Put a small amount of sphagnum moss in a glass or plastic vase or container.

Propagate Pothos

Then put the cuttings in the container. Moss should completely cover the exposed nodes at the bottom of the stems, while the remaining leaves at the top should sit on top of the moss.

Push the moss down around the cuttings to keep them in place, and make sure the moss touches the nodes of the cuttings.

Keep the Sphagnum Moss Moist

Keep the sphagnum moss evenly wet and the cuttings in a place that gets bright, indirect light. Most likely, roots won’t start to grow for a few weeks. During this time, it’s important that the moss stays damp but not soaked.

Plant the Rooted Cuttings in Soil

Planting the cuttings in soil is possible after the roots are at least 2 to 3 inches long. Most likely, this will take a couple of weeks, but it could take longer. Plant the cuttings in a small container with holes for drainage and soil that drains well.

Before moving the newly potted plant to a spot with bright, indirect light, be sure to give it a lot of water. Keep the soil evenly wet for the first one to two weeks to let the roots get used to the soil.

See more articles in this category: Outdoor Plants

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